Highly regarded as the "best beer bread on Earth" from our very own Tom Scarborough, river guide & outdoor extraordinaire, we prepare this recipe for guests on our river trips. Now you can make this bread anytime you want, which might be often because it is incredible. Enjoy! 

Ingredients

  • 3 c self-rising flour
  • 3 tbsp sugar
  • 1 tbsp dried onion flakes
  • 12 oz beer - Pilseners are ideal!

To add the "Texas Twist"

  • 1/4 tsp dried crushed chili flakes
  • 1/8 tsp dried granulated garlic

Directions

  • Prepare the coals. The general rule is that you'll need about 1:2 ratio of coals on the bottom & top of the oven. A 12-inch Dutch Oven will require about 15 coals on top of the lid, and about eight coals on the bottom.
  • Mix together the flour, sugar, and onion flakes (and the "Texas Twist" ingredients if adding). 
  • Pour in the beer (slowly so it doesn't foam over!), and combine. 
  • Lay out the dough on a floured work surface. Knead the dough lightly to form a dough ball; don't over knead the dough! It will make the bread hard once cooked. 
  • Flatten out the dough slightly, and place into a well-greased 8-to-12-inch camp-style Dutch Oven. 
  • Place oven in coals. Bake for 15-25 minutes. Check afer the first 10 minutes or so. 
  • When nice and brown on top, remove and knock on the bottom of the loaf. If it "thunks," it's done!

To learn more about this recipe, and about cooking in a Dutch Oven, click here.

Thanks to Phil Mahan from CastBullet.com for the recipe!

 

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